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September 1973

Volume 23, 1973

FEATURES

No Shortage of Gold

SEPTEMBER 01, 1973 by HANS SENNHOLZ

When money is politically managed instead of market-determined, the result is inflation and economic chaos.

Down with National Priorities

SEPTEMBER 01, 1973 by ARTHUR MODE

Let each pursue happiness in his own way at his own risk.

Portrait of an Evil Man

SEPTEMBER 01, 1973 by ERIK KUEHNELT-LEDDIHN

The world-impact of Karl Marx and his message.

Hobson's Choice

SEPTEMBER 01, 1973 by EDWARD Y. BREESE

Not the head politician but the individual citizen determines the nature of the economy and body politic.

The Limits of Credulity

SEPTEMBER 01, 1973 by ROGER DONWAY

An analysis of the dilemma of revisionist historians in their attempt to justify postwar foreign policy.

Competition: Classroom Theory vs. Business Reality

SEPTEMBER 01, 1973 by MARK PETERSON

If consumers had no choice, anyone could manage a business.

A Weary Distance

SEPTEMBER 01, 1973 by ROBERT W. DEMERS

By the sweat of one's brow does his garden grow?

Was Plato a Collectivist?

SEPTEMBER 01, 1973 by JOHN J. ROBERTS

Plato outgrew his youthful dreams of communal living.

Economics and the Press

SEPTEMBER 01, 1973 by BRIAN SUMMERS

Why the press must be free of subsidies.

Imitation

SEPTEMBER 01, 1973 by R. J. RUSHDOONY

Imitation of the idle rich, while despising productivity and abundance, is a form of mass suicide.

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April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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