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September 1974

Volume 24, 1974

FEATURES

Rewarding Failure

SEPTEMBER 01, 1974 by RICHARD C. RENSTROM

A national policy that is a sure road to disaster.

"Speak for Yourself, John" Revisited

SEPTEMBER 01, 1974 by RIDGWAY K. FOLEY JR.

Presume not to live another's life for him.

What Is Philanthrophy?

SEPTEMBER 01, 1974 by CHARLES R. LADOW

If private charity is demeaning, how may we describe governmental redistribution?

Makers or Takers

SEPTEMBER 01, 1974 by ROGER DONWAY

Why it is wrong to count on the promises of socialism.

The Beleaguered Businessman

SEPTEMBER 01, 1974 by PERRY E. GRESHAM

The case for business needs to be made as long as antibusiness groups are advocating socialism.

Reflections on Gullibility

SEPTEMBER 01, 1974 by LEONARD E. READ

The better we see our blessings the less vulnerable we are to "costless" panaceas.

Political Freedom Is Not Enough

SEPTEMBER 01, 1974 by MILLER UPTON

We need liberty as well as democracy!

Freedom's Bounty

SEPTEMBER 01, 1974 by CARL KEYSER

The importance of personal freedom for economic development and growth.

The Enigma

SEPTEMBER 01, 1974 by RALPH BRADFORD

The testing of America by citizens who are doing their utmost to destroy it.

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1974/9

SEPTEMBER 01, 1974 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN

"The Fellow-Travellers: a Postscript to the Enlightenment" by David Caute


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April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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