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September 1979

Volume 29, 1979

FEATURES

Capital Punishment

SEPTEMBER 01, 1979 by JOHN SEMMENS

How inflation and taxation discourage and prevent the generation of capital for better jobs.

Prices: Guidelines that Work

SEPTEMBER 01, 1979 by WILLIAM E. CAGE

Let the market price guide production and consumption; put the controls on government spending and inflation.

World in the Grip of an Idea: 33. Conclusion: Loosening the Grip of the Idea

SEPTEMBER 01, 1979 by CLARENCE B. CARSON

The individual is responsible for tending to his own business and fulfilling his purpose.

Foreign Policy

SEPTEMBER 01, 1979 by BETTINA BIEN GREAVES

Private property must be respected and free trade encouraged if conflicts are to be minimized.

F. A. Hayek: Classical Liberal

SEPTEMBER 01, 1979 by THOMAS W. HAZLETT

A salute to one of the great students and defenders of liberty in our time.

The Tiller, the Van, and the Typewriter

SEPTEMBER 01, 1979 by RUTH B. ALFORD

One woman's firm stand against coercive measures that disrupt and destroy an advanced market economy.

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1979/9

SEPTEMBER 01, 1979 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN



"Memoirs of a Dissident Publisher" by Henry Regnery
"Economics of Public Policy: The Micro View" by John C. Goodman and Edwin G. Dolan


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April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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