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September 1995

Volume 45, 1995

FEATURES

Taking Money Back: Part I

Money Is Different from All Other Commodities

SEPTEMBER 01, 1995 by MURRAY N. ROTHBARD

Free Market Economists: 400 Years Ago

Tracing the True Origins of Pro-Market Thinking

SEPTEMBER 01, 1995 by LLEWELLYN H. ROCKWELL JR

The Ethics of War: Hiroshima and Nagasaki After 50 Years

Was the Atomic Bomb Necessary to End World War II?

SEPTEMBER 01, 1995 by GREGORY PAVLIK

The Attack on Grassroots Liberty

The Intended Protector of Constitutional Government Has Aided Its Demise

SEPTEMBER 01, 1995 by WILLIAM J. WATKINS JR.

The Crusade for Politically Correct Consumption

Neo-Puritanism Is Running Amok

SEPTEMBER 01, 1995 by THOMAS J. DILORENZO

Legislation and Law in a Free Society

Legislation-Based Systems Have Pernicious Effects

SEPTEMBER 01, 1995 by N. STEPHAN KINSELLA

Mergers and Acquisitions: Why Greed is Good

Corporate Restructurings Help Markets Function Smoothly

SEPTEMBER 01, 1995 by PETER G. KLEIN

The Minimum Wage's Dirty Little Secret

The Minimum Wage Hurts Those It Pretends to Help

SEPTEMBER 01, 1995 by DAVID LABAND

It's Time to Privatize Unemployment Insurance

Insurance and Savings Decisions Should Be Personal

SEPTEMBER 01, 1995 by GEORGE C. LEEF, DAVID HONIGMAN

Strike Out? Blame Fast Food

Grocery Chains Are Losing the Competition for Food Sales

SEPTEMBER 01, 1995 by FRANCOIS MELESE
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April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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