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September 1998

Volume 48, 1998

FEATURES

Leonard E. Read: A Portrait

The Advancement of Human Liberty Is a Learning Process

SEPTEMBER 01, 1998 by EDMUND OPITZ

Leonard E. Read, Crusader

The Freedom Philosophy Remains an Ideal Worth Striving For

SEPTEMBER 01, 1998 by BETTINA BIEN GREAVES

The Essence of Americanism

The Ideas of Self-Reliance and Private Property Created a Spiritual, Political, and Economic Revolution

SEPTEMBER 01, 1998 by LEONARD E. READ

An Environment of Freedom

The Umbrella of Environmental Issues Is Curtailing Our Freedoms

SEPTEMBER 01, 1998 by JO KWONG

Nightmare in Green

The Authoritarian Environmental Movement Wants to Destroy Industrial Civilization

SEPTEMBER 01, 1998 by JARRET B. WOLLSTEIN

Sustainable Development: Common Sense or Nonsense on Stilts?

Society Has Long Sustained Development Without the Guidance of Green State Planners

SEPTEMBER 01, 1998 by JERRY TAYLOR

The Mythology of Roosevelt and the New Deal

Roosevelt Was a Resourceful Political Opportunist

SEPTEMBER 01, 1998 by ROBERT HIGGS

Smuggled Cigarettes, Unteachable Politicians

High Cigarette Taxes Have Predictable Consequences

SEPTEMBER 01, 1998 by JOHN ATTARIAN

A Golden Comeback, Part I

Is Gold Really Dead?

SEPTEMBER 01, 1998 by MARK SKOUSEN

If Rates of Return Matter, Social Security Is a Goner

Privatization Ought to Be a No-Brainer

SEPTEMBER 01, 1998 by LAWRENCE W. REED
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April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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