Freeman

September 2001

Volume 51, 2001

FEATURES

Put Robinson-Patman, Not Bookstore Chains, on Trial

Does the 1936 Act Really Help Consumers?

SEPTEMBER 01, 2001 by GARY M. GALLES

Why Social Security Is Popular

The Conditions That Make Social Security Popular Are Temporary and Rapidly Disappearing

SEPTEMBER 01, 2001 by HUGH MACAULAY

Of Genomes and Lemons

How Well-Intentioned Laws Can Harm the People They Mean to Protect

SEPTEMBER 01, 2001 by E. FRANK STEPHENSON, MICHAEL E. RUPERT

The New China

A Capitalist Country with a Communist Government

SEPTEMBER 01, 2001 by LARRY TRITTEN

Regulating Biodiversity: Tragedy in the Political Commons

Urbanites Want to Have Their Cake and Eat It, Too

SEPTEMBER 01, 2001 by DAVID LABAND

Lessons of History: The Great Irish Famine

Who Is to Blame for This Great Disaster?

SEPTEMBER 01, 2001 by STEPHEN DAVIES

Phony Marketeers

The Record of Conservative Free Marketeers after the Fall of Communism Is a Sorry One

SEPTEMBER 01, 2001 by NORMAN BARRY

Sovereign Traders

Consumers Are the Greatest Beneficiaries of Free Trade

SEPTEMBER 01, 2001 by PIERRE LEMIEUX

Illusion of Control

No One Can Control the Complexity and Mass of the U.S. Economy

SEPTEMBER 01, 2001 by CHRISTOPHER MAYER

Winners and Losers in the Transfer Game

No State Ever Became Rich by Relying on Federal Wealth Transfers

SEPTEMBER 01, 2001 by CHRISTOPHER WESTLEY
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