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September 2001

Volume 51, 2001

FEATURES

Put Robinson-Patman, Not Bookstore Chains, on Trial

Does the 1936 Act Really Help Consumers?

SEPTEMBER 01, 2001 by GARY M. GALLES

Why Social Security Is Popular

The Conditions That Make Social Security Popular Are Temporary and Rapidly Disappearing

SEPTEMBER 01, 2001 by HUGH MACAULAY

Of Genomes and Lemons

How Well-Intentioned Laws Can Harm the People They Mean to Protect

SEPTEMBER 01, 2001 by E. FRANK STEPHENSON, MICHAEL E. RUPERT

The New China

A Capitalist Country with a Communist Government

SEPTEMBER 01, 2001 by LARRY TRITTEN

Regulating Biodiversity: Tragedy in the Political Commons

Urbanites Want to Have Their Cake and Eat It, Too

SEPTEMBER 01, 2001 by DAVID LABAND

Lessons of History: The Great Irish Famine

Who Is to Blame for This Great Disaster?

SEPTEMBER 01, 2001 by STEPHEN DAVIES

Phony Marketeers

The Record of Conservative Free Marketeers after the Fall of Communism Is a Sorry One

SEPTEMBER 01, 2001 by NORMAN BARRY

Sovereign Traders

Consumers Are the Greatest Beneficiaries of Free Trade

SEPTEMBER 01, 2001 by PIERRE LEMIEUX

Illusion of Control

No One Can Control the Complexity and Mass of the U.S. Economy

SEPTEMBER 01, 2001 by CHRISTOPHER MAYER

Winners and Losers in the Transfer Game

No State Ever Became Rich by Relying on Federal Wealth Transfers

SEPTEMBER 01, 2001 by CHRISTOPHER WESTLEY
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April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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