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Poetry Guidelines

Call for Submissions: Poetry

The Freeman accepts poetry submissions year-round to be considered for publication in the print magazine and online. 

Although each issue has a theme of its own, poems need not relate to any theme. Our primary criterion is always literary excellence.

Guidelines

  • Payment is $50 per poem, as well as a copy of the issue of publication.
  • Submissions must be unpublished poems or translations only.
  • Simultaneous submissions are acceptable if noted as such.
  • Translations into English are accepted, but either the translator must have documented permission to publish the translations at the time of submission or the poems must be in the common domain per U.S. and international copyright law.
  • Include copies of the poems in the original language with any translation submissions.
  • Send up to 6 unpublished poems, up to 60 lines each (exceptions to the length restriction may be made in rare cases), in .doc, .docx, or .rtf format to Luke Hankins, Poetry Editor,  at poetry@fee.org.
  • You can expect a response within 6 weeks of receipt. If you have not received a response after 6 weeks, you may query by email to the poetry editor.

The Freeman acquires first North American serial rights for each poem or translation published. Rights revert to the author or translator upon publication, though The Freeman must be credited with first publication in any subsequent publication. (e.g., “'Name of Poem' originally appeared in The Freeman.”)

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CURRENT ISSUE

April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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