April Freeman Banner 2014

Economic Notions

The Bias Favoring Governments over Markets

The Success of Markets Is Easily Taken for Granted

JUNE 01, 2002 by DWIGHT R. LEE

Public Interest or Private Interest?

Public Officials Are Self-Interested, Too

MAY 01, 2002 by DWIGHT R. LEE

The Cure Can Be Worse than the Disease

We Need Government Action Less Often Than We Think

MARCH 01, 2002 by DWIGHT R. LEE

Prisoners' Dilemmas and Cooperation

Free Markets Reward Cooperation

FEBRUARY 01, 2002 by DWIGHT R. LEE

Getting the Most Out of Pollution

How about a Market for Pollution Rights?

OCTOBER 01, 2001 by DWIGHT R. LEE

The Environmental Protection Agency's attempt to reduce pollution with command and control suffers from the same problem as attempting to direct the economy with socialism—central authorities dictate outcomes without knowing what the outcomes should be or how they are best achieved.

The Perverse Popularity of Command and Control

How Industry Is Protected against Competition at the Expense of the Environment

SEPTEMBER 01, 2001 by DWIGHT R. LEE

Most government attempts to protect the environment involve imposing detailed regulations on how, and how much, pollution must be reduced. This command-and-control approach does reduce pollution, but as I explained last month, it does so at high cost.

The High Cost of Command and Control

The EPA Misses Opportunities for Low-Cost Pollution Control

AUGUST 01, 2001 by DWIGHT R. LEE

We may not all agree on how much pollution to reduce, but we certainly should agree to reduce it as cheaply as possible. Since cleaning up at least cost is exactly the same as maximizing the cleanup for any given cost, cost minimization should appeal even to those who dislike thinking about the cost of protecting the environment.

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CURRENT ISSUE

April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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