Freeman

Economics On the Trail

I Like Hayek

Who Better to Lead Economics into the 21st Century?

SEPTEMBER 01, 2001 by MARK SKOUSEN

Who should take the place of Keynes to lead economics into the 21st century? Should it be the economics of Friedman, Ludwig von Mises, Joseph Schumpeter, or F. A. Hayek? While all four have much to offer, I favor Hayek. I am not alone.

Whatever Happened to the Egyptians?

Socialist Interventionism Prevents Economic Prosperity

AUGUST 01, 2001 by MARK SKOUSEN

Great Turnabouts in Economics

Three Prominent Economists Have Changed Their Thinking

NOVEMBER 01, 1997 by MARK SKOUSEN

We can only admire the scholar who is willing to change when he is convinced by the facts or a new theory. It takes a strong dose of courage and honesty to go against one's vested interest, especially after publishing books and articles on the subject.

The Stagnation Thesis Is Back!

Macroeconomic Policy Changes Would Increase Economic Growth and Productivity

DECEMBER 01, 1995 by MARK SKOUSEN

Overworked and Underpaid?

Free-Market Economists Dispute Reich's Claims

NOVEMBER 01, 1995 by MARK SKOUSEN

Econ 101: Do We Really Need Another Samuelson?

The Next Breakthrough Economics Textbook Must Be Post-Keynesian

OCTOBER 01, 1995 by MARK SKOUSEN

Freedom for Everyone . . . Except the Immigrant

Forbes's Peter Brimelow Takes an Anti-Immigration Stance

SEPTEMBER 01, 1995 by MARK SKOUSEN

Economics on Trial

Does Austrian Business Cycle Theory Have Merit?

MARCH 01, 1995 by MARK SKOUSEN

Last month, I wrote about the long-standing debate between the Monetarists and the Austrians, which surfaces at practically every Mont Pelerin Society meeting. Both schools are ardent defenders of the free market, yet they fight incessantly over methodology and economic modeling.

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July/August 2014

The United States' corporate tax burden is the highest in the world, but innovators will always find a way to duck away from Uncle Sam's reach. Doug Bandow explains how those with the means are renouncing their citizenship in increasing numbers, while J. Dayne Girard describes the innovative use of freeports to shield wealth from the myriad taxes and duties imposed on it as it moves around the world. Of course the politicians brand all of these people unpatriotic, hoping you won't think too hard about the difference between the usual crony-capitalist suspects and the global creative elite that have done so much to improve our lives. In a special tech section, Joseph Diedrich, Thomas Bogle, and Matthew McCaffrey look at various ways these innovators add value to our lives--even in ways they probably never expected.
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