Freeman

Feature

People Over Profits?

A family feud in a grocery chain reveals a vital lesson in business and life

SEPTEMBER 22, 2014 by GARY MCGATH

When a family feud breaks out in a New England grocery chain, lessons abound in terms of the relative importance of people and profits.

The Dawn of the Surveillance State

America has been spying on its citizens for a hundred years

SEPTEMBER 17, 2014 by GARY MCGATH

We think of mass surveillance as a product of modern technology. But large-scale spying on Americans got its start in 1917, when the United States entered World War I.

Ludd vs. Schumpeter

Fear of robot labor is fear of the free market

SEPTEMBER 17, 2014 by WENDY MCELROY

An increased use of robots will cause a dislocation of labor, which will be painful for some in the near term. But if market forces are allowed to function, the dislocation will be temporary and life will improve for everyone.

Freedom and Whisky Go Together

Scottish secession is not about liberalization—yet

SEPTEMBER 16, 2014 by IAIN MURRAY

Scottish secession is not about liberalization per se, but an independent Scotland might have to rediscover Adam Smith.

Overkill: Militarizing America

Why are police arming for war in a time of relative safety?

SEPTEMBER 15, 2014 by DANIEL J. BIER

The facts about officer safety do not justify the unprecedented force and weaponry that cops are displaying today. It's time to demilitarize the police.

Thomas Piketty’s Literary Offenses

Literature can inform economics, but not if it’s used carelessly

SEPTEMBER 11, 2014 by SARAH SKWIRE, STEVEN HORWITZ

Literature can provide excellent data about how people felt about economic data; it's not economic data in its own right, though.

The Difference Praxis Makes

An alternative to college is poised to disrupt traditional higher ed

SEPTEMBER 10, 2014 by JEFFREY A. TUCKER

What do you get when you combine training in entrepreneurship, professional mentorship, work experience, and college-level coursework? A model that could disrupt higher education.

Ends, Means, and Leonard Read

An old dictum has done a lot of damage throughout history

SEPTEMBER 10, 2014 by GARY M. GALLES

Leonard Read reminded us that we are ends in ourselves, not to be used by reformers for political gain or utopian projects.

Where’s the Beef? Canada!

Love of country doesn’t mean one must also love the IRS

SEPTEMBER 09, 2014 by STEWART DOMPE, ADAM C. SMITH

Corporate inversion offers a powerful check on government and lets companies fulfill their primary purpose: protecting shareholders' capital.

Liquid Assets

Market prices for water would compel creative conservation in a drought

SEPTEMBER 08, 2014 by HOWARD BAETJER JR.

Why can anyone use as much gas as they want, however they want, but careless water usage can get you fined? Hint: It has to do with prices.

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CURRENT ISSUE

September 2014

For centuries, hierarchical models dominated human organizations. Kings, warlords, and emperors could rally groups--but also oppress them. Non-hierarchical forms of organization, though, are increasingly defining our lives. It's no secret how this shift has benefited out social lives, including dating, and it's becoming more commonplace even in the corporate world. But it has also now come even to organizations bent on domination rather than human flourishing, as the Islamic State shows. If even destructive groups rely on this form of entrepreneurial organization, then hierarchy's time could truly be coming to an end.
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