Freeman

Feature

Not Just the VA

Another example of government failure in healthcare

AUGUST 26, 2014 by TERREE P. SUMMER

Last spring's VA scandal revealed what anyone who's used a lesser-known system, the Indian Health Service, has known for years: The State can't provide healthcare.

Five Lessons K–12 Can Learn from Higher Ed

Colleges aren’t perfect, but they can be instructive for the public schools

AUGUST 25, 2014 by JENNA ROBINSON

American higher education treats students and teachers like individuals and has to deliver bang for the buck. K–12 could learn a thing or two.

The Amazing Persistence of the Movie Theater

A brand new multiplex defies technology and trend lines

AUGUST 20, 2014 by JEFFREY A. TUCKER

Just when you thought the multiplex was dead, another one is built. They are a monument to the market's power to defy prediction and forecast.

The Best Debt in the World

It's hard to believe, but Britain’s student loan problem is worse than the Yanks’

AUGUST 19, 2014 by EMMA ELLIOTT FREIRE

UK taxpayers no longer have to pick up all of the tab for university tuition, but perverse incentives and hidden costs still riddle the system.

Deputizing America

Sooner or later, we’ll all work for the State—unless we do something about it

AUGUST 18, 2014 by IAIN MURRAY

Government agencies are threatening businesses with prosecution if they fail to do the government's law enforcement legwork. It's already shutting down business.

Crony Phony Drug War

The Feds attack FedEx on behalf of Big Pharma and expand the police state

AUGUST 12, 2014 by WENDY MCELROY

A case against FedEx could mean better business for Big Pharma. It could also mean the end of one of the few slivers of privacy we have left.

Unicorn Governance

Ever argued public policy with people whose State is in fantasyland?

AUGUST 11, 2014 by MICHAEL MUNGER

It's pointless to argue about the color of unicorns; the same goes for what most people think about when they think about the State.

The Terror Business

Are militant Islamic organizations destructive firms?

AUGUST 07, 2014 by COLIN O'REILLY

We normally think of people organizing into entrepreneurial firms to create value for customers. But how might those who find "profit" in destruction organize?

Of Battlefields and Boardrooms

Are the Art of War and the Art of Enterprise two edges of the same sword?

AUGUST 06, 2014 by MATTHEW MCCAFFREY

Classical military strategists have valuable insights for entrepreneurs--but not because trade and war have anything in common.

Life Without the McDouble

McDonald’s is just one example of how enterprise makes our lives less nasty, brutish, and short

AUGUST 05, 2014 by JEFFREY A. TUCKER

From the sesame seeds to the tomato, a McDonald's hamburger is the end result of thousands of years of market coordination.

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July/August 2014

The United States' corporate tax burden is the highest in the world, but innovators will always find a way to duck away from Uncle Sam's reach. Doug Bandow explains how those with the means are renouncing their citizenship in increasing numbers, while J. Dayne Girard describes the innovative use of freeports to shield wealth from the myriad taxes and duties imposed on it as it moves around the world. Of course the politicians brand all of these people unpatriotic, hoping you won't think too hard about the difference between the usual crony-capitalist suspects and the global creative elite that have done so much to improve our lives. In a special tech section, Joseph Diedrich, Thomas Bogle, and Matthew McCaffrey look at various ways these innovators add value to our lives--even in ways they probably never expected.
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