Freeman

Vintage

Beyond Nationalism and Territorialism (1851)

APRIL 25, 2014 by PIERRE-JOSEPH PROUDHON

Proudhon, considered the father of anarchism, explains that an economic revolution is possible, perhaps even inevitable.

The Organization Man (1956)

JANUARY 10, 2014 by WILLIAM H. WHYTE

William Whyte's complaints about hierarchical, individual-effacing organizations remain compelling. What's even more so is how much more richly varied, customizable, and flexible society has become.

On Deschooling (1971)

Why We Must Disestablish School

JANUARY 03, 2014 by IVAN ILLICH

Ivan Illich analyzes compulsory State schooling in terms of power dynamics. What he finds is an inculcation of dependency and an institutionalized denial of individuals' control over their own educations. What he calls for is even more radical.

The Culture of Cities (1938)

DECEMBER 27, 2013 by LEWIS MUMFORD

The city has grown dramatically in power, eventually outpacing royal rivals--but also usually achieving territorial unity at the expense of liberty, and for the benefit of the few, instead of assembling Swiss-style confederations of cities and regions.

Nationalism (1960)

DECEMBER 20, 2013 by ELIE KEDOURIE

Nationalism is a young doctrine, birthed as much by the turmoil following the French Revolution as by any debate among the philosophers. In effect, it's a post hoc rationale granting new types and uses of political power to the State.

The Right to Self-Determination (1927, 1944)

DECEMBER 13, 2013 by LUDWIG VON MISES

In these classic essays, Mises discusses the principle of self-determination and how it has been substituted for aggressive nationalism.

Our Enemy, the State

Chapter 4: Economic Means vs. Political Means

DECEMBER 06, 2013 by ALBERT NOCK

You can satisfy your needs either by producing and exchanging wealth or by taking it by brute force. The former is the economic means and the latter is the political means.

Le Contrat Social (1922)

The ideal government is one that barely escapes being no government

NOVEMBER 15, 2013 by H.L. MENCKEN

In a classic essay from the past, H. L. Mencken discusses what makes a government good.

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CURRENT ISSUE

September 2014

For centuries, hierarchical models dominated human organizations. Kings, warlords, and emperors could rally groups--but also oppress them. Non-hierarchical forms of organization, though, are increasingly defining our lives. It's no secret how this shift has benefited our social lives, including dating, and it's becoming more commonplace even in the corporate world. But it has also now come even to organizations bent on domination rather than human flourishing, as the Islamic State shows. If even destructive groups rely on this form of entrepreneurial organization, then hierarchy's time could truly be coming to an end.
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